15/01/17 Tilde New Music Festival

https://tilde.net.au/academy/

https://www.facebook.com/events/193073391166985/

Tilde New Music & Sound Art in partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne (The Channel) presents a series of THREE public discussion events as part of the 2nd Tilde New Music Academy. These are an opportunity to get in to discussions with practitioners of different kinds, discussing various things related to their practice and contemporary music as a whole. All events take place at The Channel, Arts Centre Melbourne.

In Depth 1: Sunday the 15th of January at 2pm.
In Depth 2: Monday the 16th of January at 7pm.
In Depth 3: Tuesday the 17th of January at 7pm.

Tickets available online (click buy ticket) or from Hamer Hall before the event.

IN DEPTH I – Aviva Endean and Gary Butler

Sunday the 15th of January, 2pm-3:30pm.

A discussion on improvisation in contemporary art music practice with performances by Aviva Endean (clarinet) and Gary Butler (guitar/prepared guitar)

Unfortunately we have had to do a last-minute change to this event, and Gary Butler will now be replacing Mohamed Kubbara for a discussion on improvisation with Aviva Endean.

Gary has been performing improvised music for 20 years. His interest in extending the range of the guitar has led to him rubbing pizza into the strings, throwing a guitar from a 3rd storey window, nailing a guitar to a cross, having food fights with his family on stage, writing a PhD thesis on prepared instruments, playing J.S. Bach’s “Prelude in Dm” and playing/attacking the guitar with various items including (but not limited to) toys, a bird cage, a vibrator, shoes, sticks, polystyrene, fireworks, a battery operated masturbating hand, an axe and a kitchen sink

“Is there anything you can’t do to a guitar?” Jon Rose

“This covers a lot of ground, reminds me of the days when improvising was fun and is satisfyingly real.” Chris Cutler

“For the finale, Butler hacked apart a guitar with a pickaxe . . . He may have looked like a serial killer, but this was about controlled chaos.” The Age